Thomas Brochhagen

Thomas Brochhagen
Universitat Pompeu Fabra

I conduct research in computational linguistics at the Computational Linguistics and Linguistic Theory group in Barcelona. I'm interested in how humans and machines deal with ambiguity and underspecification, as well as in the dynamics involved in the emergence and change of linguistic patterns in both natural and artificial environments.


Research

Brief at the risk of being misunderstood: Consolidating population- and individual-level tendencies
Thomas Brochhagen. 2021. Computational Brain & Behavior. DOI: 10.1007/s42113-021-00099-x
[code repository]   [view-only version]   [post peer-review, pre-copyedit manuscript]

Game Theory in Pragmatics
Thomas Brochhagen. Forthcoming. In Oxford Bibliographies in Linguistics. Ed. Mark Aronoff. New York: Oxford University Press

Modeling word interpretation with deep language models: The interaction between expectations and lexical information
Laura Aina, Thomas Brochhagen & Gemma Boleda. 2020. Proceedings of the 42th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2020)
[code repository]

Deep daxes: Mutual exclusivity arises through both learning biases and pragmatic strategies in neural networks
Kristina Gulordava, Thomas Brochhagen & Gemma Boleda. 2020. Proceedings of the 42th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2020)

Extremes are typical. A game theoretical derivation
Robert van Rooij & Thomas Brochhagen. 2020. Language, Cognition, and Mind, vol. 7, p. 351-363. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-030-50200-3_16

Coevolution of Lexical Meaning and Pragmatic Use
Thomas Brochhagen, Michael Franke & Robert van Rooij. 2018. Cognitive Science. DOI: 10.1111/cogs.12681

Signaling under uncertainty
Thomas Brochhagen. 2018. PhD Thesis, University of Amsterdam

Signalling under Uncertainty: Interpretative Alignment without a Common Prior
Thomas Brochhagen. 2017. The British Journal for the Philosophy of Science. DOI: 10.1093/bjps/axx058

Effects of transmission perturbation in the cultural evolution of language
Thomas Brochhagen & Michael Franke. 2017. Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2017), pp. 1678-1683

Learning biases may prevent lexicalization of pragmatic inferences: a case study combining iterated (Bayesian) learning and functional selection
Thomas Brochhagen, Michael Franke & Robert van Rooij. 2016. Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2016), pp. 2081-2086

Improving Coordination on Novel Meaning through Context and Semantic Structure
Thomas Brochhagen. 2015. Proceedings of the Sixth Workshop on Cognitive Aspects of Computational Language Learning (CogACLL 2015), ACL, pp 74-82

Minimal Requirements for Productive Compositional Signaling
Thomas Brochhagen. 2015. Proceedings of the 37th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society (CogSci 2015), pp. 285-290

Diagnosing Truth, Interactive Sincerity, and Depictive Sincerity
Elizabeth Coppock & Thomas Brochhagen. 2013. Proceedings of Semantics and Linguistic Theory 23 (SALT 23), pp. 358-375. DOI: 10.3765/salt.v23i0.2662

Raising and Resolving Issues with Scalar Modifiers
Elizabeth Coppock & Thomas Brochhagen. 2013. Semantics and Pragmatics, Volume 6, Article 3, pp. 1-57. DOI: 10.3765/sp.6.3

Only, At Least, At Most, More and Less
Thomas Brochhagen & Elizabeth Coppock. 2013. 87th annual LSA meeting


Teaching & Supervision

Teaching
At the Universitat Pompeu Fabra


At the University of Amsterdam


At the University of Düsseldorf


Supervision



About

In the fall of 2019, I joined the Computational Linguistics and Linguistic Theory group in Barcelona, as a member of the AMORE project. In the preceding months I was affiliated to the Formal Linguistics Research Group, also in Barcelona. You can find me at Roc Boronat 138, office 52.631.

From 2014 to 2018, I conducted research at the Institute for Logic, Language and Computation in Amsterdam. My research focused on natural language properties that can give rise to uncertainty, such as ambiguity and underspecificity, and their evolution in both human and artificial communication. That is what my doctoral thesis is about. Within this period, I also spent time at the Centre for Intelligent Systems and their Applications in Edinburgh and the Sony Computer Science Laboratory in Paris. My research fellowship was awarded through ESSENCE, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie initial training network on the Evolution of Shared Semantics in Computational Environments.

Before moving to Amsterdam, I received a bachelor's and a master's in linguistics from the University of Düsseldorf. From 2011 to 2014, I was also a research assistant in the CRC 991 (Project B01: Verb frames at the syntax-semantics interface).